A (micro)economic world history, danced.

A (micro)eco
nomic world history, d
anced

By Pascal Rambert and Éric Méchoulan / Directed by Pascal Rambert
Accoutrement
Pascal Rambert
Dramaturgy
Susanne Meister
Chorleitung
Karin Pawolka
Choreography
Pascal Rambert
Texts
Hilke Bardua, Katrin Bätje, Dagmar Brehmer-Neumann, Kristof Danlowski, Mila Danlowski, Silke Dannenberg, Patric de Haan, Carsten Diederichsen, Birgit Grodtmann, Lars Hanebutte, Ines Hirschfeld, Karen Horwege, Hadjara Issaka, Mohamed Moustapha Issaka, Bernd Kalvelage, Inken Kirkerup, Julia Kossmann, Antonia Krämer, Ralf Kuhlemann, Maria Lanman, Klaus Lorenzen, Torsten Mendach, Janina Nielebock, Annette Noch, Sibylle Raasch, Ferdinand Rein sch, Ramona Richter, Ingrid Rögner, Amanda Babaei Vieira, Kaya Wittrock, Manon Wetzel, Karin Wolf, Sarah Wray, Andreas Wüst
 
Choir
Wolfgang Ahrens, Till Andersen, Julia Becker, Sybille Förster, Sigurd Hartwigsen, Heiko Hillebrecht, AnneChristin Mente, Karin Pawolka, Anne Römer, Uta Sandrucci, Frank Schüler, Johann Steffen, Maren von Bülow

The crisis will not end! From the bartering of the Südsee natives to the global credit crunch: taking private stories on the crisis, French theatre artist Pascal Rambert has created a collective theatre evening with residents of the Pariser Banlieue. As one of France’s most innovative theatre artists, Rambert now works all over the world as an author, director and choreographer. He turned the theatre he directed in Paris, the Théâtre de Gennevilliers, into a place for young and international artists. After the world premiere in Paris, Rambert re-staged ‘A (micro)economic world history, danced’ for different theatres in France and Japan, with the input of local residents. Now, live on stage at Thalia Theater, 40 Hamburg citizens write texts as co-authors, perform and, together with a philosopher and four actresses, reflect upon how economics could become the leading science of our time. For Rambert, the theatrical experimental assembly is a kind of alternative business model: 40 different people – officials, artists, the unemployed, scientists – come together as a group of equals for the evening. “For theatre,” says Rambert, “is a collective thing. Yes we can – life is not fate. Be your own director!”


This is already Pascal Rambert’s second time working at Thalia Theater. Last season he staged his piece ‘Love’s End’. The premiere will form part of the Lessingtage 2015 and subsequently the evening will be part of the repertoire in Gaußstraße.


Premiere 26th January, Thalia Theater

moving to Thalia Gaußstraße Aftwerwards